Recommendation | Naughts & Crosses Series by Malorie Blackman

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It took me ages to decide if I’d step out of my comfy book nook and write something regarding the issues happening here. Obviously I decided to take the leap because I wrote this post. This past month there’s been  a palpable tension in America – racial tension between blacks and whites mostly (obviously not all blacks and whites, but for the purpose of this post I just made it general).

To be honest, it’s always there lurking in the shadows but recently it’s come in full force with police brutality and civilian retaliation. With the shooting of Alton Sterling in Baton Rogue, LA and Philando Castile in Saint Paul, Minn the people are restless. However, this isn’t the first time a Black life has been taken by law enforcement, there was: Tamir Rice (12), Eric Garner (43), Michael Brown (18), Rekia Boyd (22), Darrien Hunt (22), and so many more. To state it simply, the black community doesn’t believe that our nations vox populi believe that black lives matter.

However, tragedy struck again with the killing of Dallas police officers in “retaliation” by a lone gunman. There’s an overall feeling of severe repudiation and despondency that’s currently resonating throughout our country. The rather contemptuous attitudes existing in our country over black lives is heartbreaking and needs to cease, along with senseless killings of our law enforcement. Taking more innocent lives solve nothing, accomplishes nothing, and proves nothing. My heart goes out to all the lives lost in such a short span of time, and I hope this series can give a bit of healing to the broken.

This is for the real organizers all over the country – the activists, the civil rights attorneys, the struggling parents, the families, the teachers, the students that are realizing that a system built to divide and impoverish and destroy us cannot stand if we do.

– Jesse Williams


Callum is a naught, a second-class citizen in a society run by the ruling Crosses. Sephy is a Cross, and daughter of the man slated to become prime minister. In their world, white naughts and black Crosses simply don’t mix — and they certainly don’t fall in love. But that’s exactly what they’ve done.


When they were younger, they played together. Now Callum and Sephy meet in secret and make excuses. But excuses no longer cut it when Sephy and her mother are nearly caught in a terrorist bombing planned by the Liberation Militia, with which Callum’s family is linked. Callum’s father is the prime suspect…and Sephy’s father will stop at nothing to see him hanged. The blood hunt that ensues will threaten not only Callum and Sephy’s love for each other, but their very lives.

Random Friday #4: The Book Thief, The Picture of Dorian Gray & First

Random Fridays - DA

Random Fridays  is a weekly meme hosted by Rebeca at “Books and Messy Buns”. Anyone can join, you just have to do the following:

  • Pick up the book you’re currently reading (or read last)
  • Go to this random number generator and insert the total amount of pages in your book
  • Generate a random number
  • Open your book in the page with number you got
  • Repeat step 2 and 3 but with the number of lines in that page
  • Your random sentence is the first sentence in the line with the number you got (it doesn’t matter if the sentence starts a few lines before)
  • Make a post in your own blog where you share your sentence and link back to my blog as the host
  • Share the link to your post in the comments’ section here for the book community to see :)

If she’d seen me, I’m sure she would have a Saukerl, though I would not have taken it badly. – The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

We have had such a pleasant chat about music. – The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

I blow out the air that wants to stay trapped in my lungs. – First by M. A. Grant

 

Wallbanger (Cocktail #1) by Alice Clayton

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A +

★ ★ ★ ★ ★

The first night after Caroline moves into her fantastic new San Francisco apartment, she realizes she’s gaining an intimate knowledge of her new neighbor’s nocturnal adventures. Thanks to paper-thin walls and the guy’s athletic prowess, she can hear not just his bed banging against the wall but the ecstatic response of what seems (as loud night after loud night goes by) like an endless parade of women. And since Caroline is currently on a self-imposed dating hiatus, and her neighbor is clearly lethally attractive to women, she finds her fantasies keep her awake even longer than the noise. So when the wallbanging threatens to literally bounce her out of bed, Caroline, clad in sexual frustration and a pink baby-doll nightie, confronts Simon Parker, her heard-but-never-seen neighbor. The tension between them is as thick as the walls are thin, and the results just as mixed. Suddenly, Caroline is finding she may have discovered a whole new definition of neighborly…


*Disclaimer: this book is outrageously hilarious and will lead to giggling fits, rough chuckles, and boisterous laughter. Read at your own risk.*

Keep this in mind: Caroline hasn’t had an orgasm in a loooooong time.

“I shrugged it off, thinking maybe she just needed a night away, still experiencing a little PTSD from Pizza Parlor Cory.”

Funny is an inadequate word to describe how humorous this book actually was. It’s so rare that a book can make me laugh so hard I cry, but this novel achieved that feat numerous times. Wallbanger follows the lives of two neighbors, Caroline and Simon, as they work their way from enemies, to friends, to lovers.

The first time Caroline meets Simon is through the shaking and banging of her apartment wall. The second time was her banging on his door to keep quite while she’s trying to…do things. After this meeting they hate each other, while also being attracted to each other.

What I loved about this novel was the friendship that they built before anything happens between them. They hate each other and then are forced to be friends after their friends begin dating. But then they realize they have a lot in common and that they’re kinda awesome for each other.

Omigosh, Clive! You have yet to meet the coolest cat ever.

I can’t even explain how much fun it was to read this book! Just read it!

Sweet Tooth, Vol. 1: Out of the Deep Woods (Sweet Tooth #1) | Review

6954438★ ★ ★

A cross between Bambi and Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, SWEET TOOTH tells the story of Gus, a rare new breed of human/animal hybrid children, has been raised in isolation following an inexplicable pandemic that struck a decade earlier. Now, with the death of his father he’s left to fend for himself . . . until he meets a hulking drifter named Jepperd who promises to help him. Jepperd and Gus set out on a post-apocalyptic journey into the devastated American landscape to find ‘The Preserve’ a refuge for hybrids.
[Blurb: Goodreads]

 


I’ve always had a love/hate relationship with reviewing Graphic Novels – the pros are cons and vice-versa. On one hand, I’d like to assault your beautiful eyes with the illustrations of Jeff Lemire’s characters and setting, however, after awhile, you’d overdose on the images and this review would just be congested. But on the other hand, it’d be sacrilegious to not show images of the novel since it’s a graphic novel! Here in lies my problem, and why I rarely write reviews for graphic novels. Now that that rant’s complete, shall we get to the review?!

Out of The Deep Woods (Sweet Tooth, Vol. 1) is a really freaking weird novel, even for a post apocalyptic, dystopian. Featuring animal/human hybrid children and the world going to shit – I’d hope that would be the only reason animal/human hybrid children exist – after a disease known as the Affliction (ominous right!) killed off billions people. So, a new species is fabricated known as animal-hybrid children. However, these children are hunted, by hunters, to be hunted….hehe.

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The story follows the journey of a sweet, deer animal-hybrid kid named Gus, aka Sweet Tooth, and his mountain-like savior Jeppard, after saving Gus from the aforementioned hunters. Along the journey to the safe haven for hybrid children like Gus called The Preserve, we don’t meet a copious group characters, but we do encounter a few: mock animal-hybrid prostitutes, hunters, and savage hyena-looking murderers.

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This novel being so short didn’t leave much room for development of any kind. Since this is Volume one I kind of expected to learn a bit more about the characters or story line, however, I didn’t learn anything. The only storyish foreshadow is that animal-hybrid children exist because of a disease, which hasn’t been explained, killed most of the people. There’s a few fighting scenes that, I guess, shed light on both Gus and Jeppard’s characters. Mainly we got the emotional impact of a world without rules, morals and ethics, through the eyes of this boy who’s the foil of this whole world in a way. He’s sweet, innocent and compassionate in a world that’s done away with all those things. The end is also unsatisfying but that’s due to there being a Volume two.

 

WWW Wednesday

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This is a weekly meme hosted by Taking On A World Of Words (SamAnnElizabeth) where we answer the three questions:

  • What are you currently reading?
  • What did you just finish reading?
  • What are you planning on reading next?

What are you currently reading?

I actually mentioned that I would be reading The Picture of Dorian Gray in this edition of WWW’s.

What did you just finish reading?

Left by Shyla Colt – ★ ★ ★ (shortie/IR-Multicultural/Romance)

The Martian by Andy Weir – ★ ★ ★ ★ (science fiction/humor/space)

Tattered Love (Needle’s Kiss #1) by  Lola Stark – ★ ★ ★ (New Adult/romance/ex-military)

Power by Kenya Wright – ★ ★ ★ ★ (IR-Multicultural/Romance/Dark/bad boy)

Maze (The Ballerina #2) by Ursula Sinclair – ★ ★ ★ (New Adult/IR-Multicultural/bad boy)

What are you planning on reading next?

 

The Possibilities Are Endless

Mid Year Book Freak Out Tag

The year’s closer to being over than not and I’ve accomplished diddly squat. That’s not entirely true, but I feel like time is speeding up much too fast, so this tag actually allowed me to reflect on the beginning of the year! Thank you orang-utan librarian and icebreaker694 for tagging me! Check out their blogs if you like reading entertaining stuff. Let’s go:

Best Book You’ve Read Yet in 2016

This wasn’t a conclusion I came to lightly. There was a large amount of math and science involved that allowed for these two novels to win, blah blah blah. Okay, so that’s obviously false, but I did think about it for awhile before making this decision.

Best Sequel You’ve Read So Far in 2016

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I haven’t read many sequels this year, so I guess  Saga Vol. 2

New Release You Haven’t Read Yet But Want To

There’s so many but these two will do.

Continue reading

WWW Wednesday

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This is a weekly meme hosted by Taking On A World Of Words (SamAnnElizabeth) where we answer the three questions:

  • What are you currently reading?
  • What did you just finish reading?
  • What are you planning on reading next?

What are you currently reading?

What did you just finish reading?

Once Upon a Half-Time by Sosie Frost – ★ ★ ★ (New Adult/Sports romance/fun)
All We Have Is Now by Lisa Schroeder – DNF (Dystopian/YA/boring)

What are you planning on reading next?

Don’t know – I’m kind of in a book funk – there’s nothing I’m really excited to read right now.

TV Tuesday

Tuesday

‘Ello, this is the TV Tuesday Meme! It’s quite simple, every Tuesday you’ll do these things:

Choose between these three:

  • Book-to-Movie/TV show adaptation  (have you seen it? If no, do you plan to?)
  • Book you think should be a movie/TV show  (Why?)
  • Movie/TV show that prompted you to read a book?

*Optional – put up the trailer

Lastly:

  • Link back to your post in the comments section (so I can stalk your post ;D)


Book-to-Movie/TV show adaptation

 

The Last Kingdom posses a magnetic appeal to the historian in us all. With its play on the struggle between two rivals and their differing lifestyles, cultures, customs and religions. We’re told this history through the sideline story of Uhtred of Bebbanburg (or Ragnarson) – the heir of an English colony (sorta), however captured by Danes and raised as such  – as he tries to reclaim his throne. The history in the television series is a mixture of fiction and true historical facts, from the mind of the illustrious Bernard Cornwell in his series The Saxon Stories, in which The Last Kingdom was just the beginning. To give an accurate description of this show by comparison to others, it’d be a Games of Thrones/ Poldark/Vikings hybrid. It’s humorous, dark and supremely entertaining with an insider’s glance into the world Pre-England. (Totally off-topic, but Uhtred is gorgeous)



TV Tuesday | John Carter

Tuesday

‘Ello, this is the TV Tuesday Meme! It’s quite simple, every Tuesday you’ll do these things:

Choose between these three:

  • Book-to-Movie/TV show adaptation  (have you seen it? If no, do you plan to?)
  • Book you think should be a movie/TV show  (Why?)
  • Movie/TV show that prompted you to read a book?

*Optional – put up the trailer

Lastly:

  • Link back to your post in the comments section (so I can stalk your post ;D)

Movie/TV show that prompted you to read a book?

John Carter, while not held in high-esteem for its, “uneven pacing and occasionally incomprehensible plotting and characterization,” (Rotten Tomatoes) it cannot be easily dismissed. There’s adventure and exploration on our neighboring Red Planet, Mars, with clarity and distinction (although inaccurate). John Carter is simply a fun movie with an extreme variety of creatures, customs, and cultures directly originated from the imagination of Edgar Rice Burroughs, the author of the Barsoom series. It’s because of the lackluster feel of the film adaptation, John Carter, that I decided to read the novel. Figuring that the novel would provide more clarity and sustenance – along with a proper ending – I ventured into the world of written Barsoom and realized (rather quickly) that the movie worked off of what it was given as an original. My review will be up soon.